Using AVA and Browser Download to Install Your Software

Autodesk has updated its method to download the latest versions of its software. The new method is to use the Autodesk Virtual Agent (“AVA”), which is at

In the Response Bar, type Download, and you will see options to download. If the window is wide enough, you will see it on the right side; if the window is narrow, you may see it underneath the Response Bar.

We strongly recommend you use the Browser Download method for your software:

The “Download Now” (also sometimes referred to as “Install Now”) method streams the data over the Internet during the installation process, and this can cause the installation to fail if there are any interruptions in communication during the process.

When the download is complete, run the part which includes the phrase 001_00x. This is the first part, and it will automatically extract all of the installation files to the C:\Autodesk directory.

Once the installer is complete, your computer will still have the downloaded EXE files, as well as the installation files in C:\Autodesk. You can archive these for future use, copy them to a server for installations on other computers, or remove them if your C:\ drive is low on space.

If you have additional questions regarding this topic, please reach out to us at

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Top 12 Tips for Utilizing Revit Groups

Using groups in Revit seems to be a no brainer; we create groups for elements that are repetitive and yet we are still able to quantify them as if they were individual elements. Modify one instance of the group and it will be updated everywhere in the entire project. One can even exclude an element from a group instance to make an exception.

Over the years, Autodesk has improved upon this awesome tool, but has not made it more flexible. If we create a group the wrong way, Revit gets upset. You don’t want to see Revit upset. In actuality, Revit actually gets confused. The main problems occur when groups contain elements that are constrained outside the group. In the simplest form, if one was to create a group of elements including a door, the wall where the door is hosted would need to be within that group. And in many instances the wall could have a top constraint that is not applicable for all instances. It is also common to create groups for casework that rely on the walls for placement, but the walls are not part of the group. In class, you may have heard me say, groups should be “self-centered”. These types of constrained can also cause problems in Design Options.

That being said, yes, there are restrictions that one should be aware of when implementing the use of groups throughout a big project. Here are some tips.

  1. Put elements and their hosts in the same group.
  2. Ensure all elements in the group are hosted to the same level.
    1. Some elements may not behave correctly. Line based families for instance.
  3. Don’t constrain elements outside the group. There are many kinds of constraints.
  4. Large numbers of elements in a group will hinder performance, and possibly cause corruption.
  5. It is better to have many small groups than a few large groups.
  6. Don’t nest Groups. Don’t have groups inside groups.
  7. If you see a warning asking you to fix the groups, don’t. Fixing the group really doesn’t fix the group. It actually explodes it or creates a new group that is no longer referenced to the first group.
  8. Name groups correctly. Don’t make copies of groups called Group1.
  9. Although we are now able to mirror groups, some elements with constraints still cause problems when mirrored. Ceilings in groups get confused when mirrored.
  10. Take ownership of the group type workset when editing
    1. All elements in a group reside on the group instance workset.
    2. Be Aware of the ownership of type properties.
  11. Be cautious putting floor or stairs in groups. Don’t lock the sketch lines to other objects.
  12. Groups can be used to distribute elements and then can be un-grouped.

In a previous post, I discussed “What Causes Revit Data Corruption?” and some model maintenance suggestions, “Revit Project Maintenance Guidelines”. I hope you find this article and those listed here helpful. Reach out with questions or comments anytime.


Best Practices with Revit Groups: Rule #1

About Best Practices for Groups Autodesk Knowledge Network

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How to Use Reality Capture & Scanning for 3D Documentation

Explore how to use reality capture and scanning to convert reality into a 3D model or 2D drawing that’s ready for further design, so you can start your design with accurate dimensions and full photo-quality context rather than a blank screen.

Learn about how LANGAN uses their surveying data for a variety of applications; from site visualizations and mass models to BIM support and forensic studies, as well as how to:

  • Use automatic registration in order to create an accurate, scalable 3D point cloud from your scan data in minutes.
  • Use ReCap to import, view, and edit point clouds to prepare them for other Autodesk products.
  • Add notes, measurements, pictures, and hyperlinks to your project, and share with collaborators

Review our webinar with Joseph Romano and Matthew Sipple from LANGAN Engineering as they discuss the use of reality capture to experience the increased speed and workflow capabilities for scan and photogrammetry projects.

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